US had warned Russia ISIS was determined to attack

 The United States warned Moscow that ISIS fighters were intent on attacking Russia in the days before attackers stormed Crocus City Hall in an attack that killed dozens, but President Vladimir Putin dismissed the advice as "provocative."



Gunmen stormed a concert hall near Moscow on Friday, opened fire and threw a Molotov cocktail in the worst terrorist attack in the Russian capital in decades.


ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack.


Experts said the scale of the carnage — some of which was captured in video footage obtained by CNN that showed crowds of people gathered behind padded benches as gunshots echoed through the Great Hall — would be deeply embarrassing for the Russian leader who championed his message. National Security just a week ago, by winning the elections organized by the country.


They said that not only were Russian intelligence services unable to prevent the attack, but Putin failed to heed US warnings that extremists were planning to attack Moscow.


Earlier this month, the US Embassy in Russia said it was "following reports that extremists have imminent plans to attack large gatherings in Moscow," including concerts, and warned US citizens to avoid such venues.


US National Security Council spokeswoman Adrienne Watson said that the US government "shared this information with Russian authorities in accordance with its long-standing 'duty to warn' policy."


But in a speech on Tuesday, Putin criticized the US warnings, describing them as "provocative" and saying that "these actions resemble outright blackmail and the intention to intimidate and destabilize our society."


This position came despite the Russian authorities reporting several incidents linked to ISIS in the past month.


State agency RIA Novosti reported on March 3 that six ISIS members were killed in an anti-terrorism operation in Ingushet Karabulak; On March 7, he said that security services discovered and “neutralized” a cell of the banned Khorasan Province organization in the Kaluga region, whose members were planning an attack on a synagogue in Moscow; On March 20, he said that the leader of an ISIS combat group had been arrested.


Two sources familiar with US information said that since November, there has been a steady flow of information that ISIS-K — an ISIS affiliate active in Afghanistan and the surrounding region — is determined to attack Russia.


Moscow has clearly intervened in the Syrian civil war, both in support of President Bashar al-Assad and against ISIS.


ISIS-K “sees Russia as complicit in activities that regularly persecute Muslims,” said Michael Kugelman of the Washington-based Wilson Center, quoted by Reuters.


He added that the group also includes members of several Central Asian militants, who have their own grievances against Moscow.


A US official said on Friday that Washington had no reason to doubt ISIS's claims of responsibility for the latest attack.


On Friday, following reports of the attack on Crocus City Hall, the US Embassy advised US citizens not to travel to Russia.

Trump stares down first derailment of his campaign-to-courthouse strategy

 For days, Donald Trump's anger over the requirement to secure hundreds of millions of dollars in rewards by Monday has been simmering behind the scenes and through a steady stream of social media posts.



Friday's public campaign on the Truth Social platform, which included multiple posts in all caps, highlighted his ongoing anger at the judge who handed down the $464 million judgment, the New York prosecutor who brought the civil fraud case, and Trump's insistence that everything is by design. . Obstructing his presidential campaign.


The posts, including one sent just before 2 a.m. On Friday, it contained a mixture of invective and assertions devoid of facts or evidence. (There is no evidence that the White House played any role in the case brought by New York Attorney General Letitia James, let alone directed her to continue her efforts. Nor is there evidence that Trump, as he has claimed, plans to use some of his own money for his presidential campaign.)


But there was also a truth embedded in the posts that pushed Trump's company and personal finances to the brink with only two days left to find a solution.


Trump, as he noted, has a significant amount of cash, according to a review of his candidate's recent financial disclosure and personal financial statements.


It's a point he repeatedly emphasized in testimony and testimony during the New York fraud trial, though he differed from his recent claim on social media that he had "nearly half a billion dollars in cash." He has consistently pegged the number throughout the legal proceedings at $400 million, and barring any recent unreported cash infusion, a person familiar with his finances confirmed that that number remains roughly where his cash holdings are.


However, even if the higher estimate were accurate, as Trump's lawyers have made clear in sober and detailed filings, it would not be enough.


The $464 million judgment, the bail that Trump is struggling to secure to avoid potential seizure of his assets, would require cash or cash equivalents of about $557 million, according to industry practices.


At least some of Trump's money is tied up in loan agreements that include terms that require him to obtain tens of millions of dollars in cash.


In other words, as Monday's deadline approaches, securing bail of the required size remains, in the words of Trump's lawyer, "virtually impossible."

DNA collected from chewing gum leads to arrest and conviction in 1980 cold case murder

 DNA found on a piece of discarded gum led to the arrest and conviction of a suspect in a 1980 cold case murder in Oregon, prosecutors said.


Robert Plimpton, 60, was convicted last week of first-degree murder and four counts of second-degree murder for the killing of Mount Hood Community College student Barbara Tucker, according to a news release from the Multnomah County District Attorney. office. office.


The statement said 19-year-old Tucker was "kidnapped, sexually assaulted and beaten to death" on Jan. 15, 1980. Rape and sexual assault charges against Plimpton were dropped, according to a document released by the district attorney's office.


Plimpton has pleaded not guilty and his lawyers say they plan to appeal his conviction. “We will appeal and are confident that their convictions will be overturned,” attorneys Stephen Howes and Jacob Howes said in a statement to CNN.


Plimpton remains in custody in Multnomah County awaiting sentencing, the district attorney's office said. His sentencing hearing is scheduled for June.


The witness heard screaming

Barbara Tucker

Family of Barbara Tucker Tucker/Gresham Police Department

The document issued by the prosecutor's office said that eyewitnesses saw a woman who appeared to be in distress at the time of the killing. One woman described seeing a woman “beating her arms and her face covered in blood,” while another said she “saw a man looking through the bushes next to the (university) parking lot.”


One man said he heard a woman screaming and saw two people in the distance, and a fourth witness reported seeing a woman with mud on her pants, waving her arms on the side of the road.


Detective D.K. Wood accompanies Elroy Harrison this morning after his arrest for the 1986 murder of Jacqueline Laird.

Related articles

A man has been arrested after DNA helped solve a cold case

Tucker's body was discovered the next morning near the parking lot by students heading to classes at Gresham College, the district attorney's news release said.


“These unsolved cases are not lost or forgotten to our department,” then-Police Chief Claudio Grandjean said in a statement following Plimpton’s arrest in June 2021.


“Each of them represents a person to our officers, and their tragic stories are passed down from generation to generation in the hope that one day their names will be honored, justice will be felt, and their cases will be closed.”


According to the prosecutor's press release, swabs taken during Tucker's autopsy were used to create a DNA profile of the suspect.


The break in the investigation came after police asked Virginia-based DNA technology company Parabon NanoLabs to examine the profile and try to identify possible matches.

Congress races to pass spending bill as partial shutdown looms

 The House of Representatives approved a spending package that will fund the US government through September.



This is the first step in the race by lawmakers in the US Congress to beat the midnight deadline that will lead to a partial shutdown of the US government.


The final vote was 286 votes to 134, much higher than the two-thirds majority required. All but 23 Democrats supported the legislation, while 112 Republicans voted against it.


The package will now move to the Democratic-controlled Senate, where it is expected to gain enough support to pass by Friday night.


The $1.2 trillion (£951 billion) legislation was the result of bipartisan negotiations and funds a wide range of federal services through October, including a 3% increase in US defense funding.


The vote was another example of the difficulty the narrow Republican majority in the House of Representatives has faced in approving new spending legislation since it took control of the chamber last year.


A small but vocal group of conservatives has opposed the proposed increases in government spending and called for new legislation that includes changes to US immigration laws aimed at addressing the surge in illegal immigrants at the southern US border.


“No House Republican in good conscience could vote for this bill,” Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia said during Friday debate on the House package.


“It is a complete departure from all our principles.”


Why do lockdowns only seem to happen in the US?

A crucial shutdown test for House Speaker Mike Johnson

Greene has since introduced a motion to force the election of a new Speaker of the House and replace Mike Johnson of Louisiana.


Hardline Republicans used the same tactic last year to fire former President Kevin McCarthy over another budget dispute. The move plunged Congress into chaos for weeks as Republicans searched for a new leader to lead the House.


The Georgia congresswoman took the first procedural step to carry out her threat to oust the replacement Republicans finally got: Mr. Johnson.


Ms Green described the motion as a "red flag and a pink slip" while speaking to reporters on Friday, because it allowed the vote to be postponed until next month. He added that he respects the council and does not wish to "cause chaos in the council."


But his latest tactic could lead to another bitter battle for the GOP leadership in the House of Representatives just months before the US election in November.


Meanwhile, the House's budget vote on Friday continues a trend of recent battles over government funding, with Democrats joining some Republicans to pass legislation to avert a shutdown.


However, unlike recent votes, a majority of House Republicans opposed the funding bill negotiated by their party.


If the Senate does not approve the legislation, operational funding for some parts of the U.S. government will cease, although the full impact will not be felt until the new work week begins on Monday.

Rep. Mike Gallagher to resign in April, leaving House GOP with a razor-thin majority

  Or Gallagher's resignation would reduce the GOP's already weak control of the House of Representatives.

With his departure, the Republican majority in the House of Representatives will drop to 217 to 213, meaning that House Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA) can only afford to lose one Republican member of the vote, especially if Democrats vote along party lines.



Republicans won 222-213 after the 2022 midterm elections.


Gallagher, chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the Chinese Communist Party, is the latest in a string of GOP members to leave Congress early.


Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colorado) will leave office on Friday.


Rep. Bill Johnson (R-Ohio) resigned in January.


Former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) left office late last year after being removed from the House's top job.


Former Rep. George Santos (R-N.Y.) was fired shortly after being charged with fraud, money laundering, theft of public funds and making false statements, and was replaced by Democrat Tom Suozzi.


Several other House Republicans, including House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.), House Financial Services Chairman Patrick McHenry (R-N.C.), and House Appropriations Committee Chairman Kay Granger (Republican from Texas). They announced that they will retire at the end of the year.



Gallagher announced in February that he would not seek re-election in 2024.

Reuters

“Four terms in Congress from northeastern Wisconsin have been the honor of my life and strengthened my belief that America is the greatest country in the history of the world,” Gallagher said. “I will always be proud of the work I did on the Intelligence and Armed Services committees, chairing the Solar Cyberspace Commission, and chairing the Select Committee of the Communist Party of China.”


“It has been a true honor to serve in the House of Representatives.”


Gallagher, one of three Republicans in the House of Representatives who voted against the ouster of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, had previously announced that he would not seek re-election in 2017.

ISIS claims responsibility for attack at Moscow-area concert venue that left at least 60 dead

 ISIS claimed responsibility for an attack on a popular music complex near Moscow on Friday after attackers stormed the venue with weapons and incendiary devices, killing at least 60 people and wounding 145 others.



The terrorist organization claimed responsibility for the attack in a brief statement published by the ISIS-affiliated Amaq Agency on Telegram on Friday. No evidence was provided to support this claim.




Video footage from Crocus City Hall shows the huge complex, which includes the music hall and shopping mall, engulfed in flames and smoke billowing into the air. The government agency RIA Novosti reported that the gunmen "opened fire from automatic weapons" and "threw a grenade or incendiary bomb, causing a fire." The agency added that they "then fled in a white Renault car."






State media outlet Russia 24 reported that the roof of the venue had partially collapsed.




The fire was largely contained after more than six hours. “There are still some pockets of fire, but the fire has been mostly extinguished,” Moscow Governor Andrei Vorobyov said via Telegram.




Friday's attack, the deadliest terrorist attack on Moscow in decades, came less than a week after President Vladimir Putin won a fraudulent election in a landslide to secure another term in office, strengthening his grip on the country he has ruled since changing the government. Century.




With attention focused on the country's war with neighboring Ukraine, Putin announced a national security message before Russians headed to the polls.




The massacre occurred before a concert by the band Picnic, according to Russia 24 channel. The band's manager told state media that the artists were unharmed.




“Unidentified persons wearing camouflage clothing stormed Crocus City Hall and started shooting before the concert began,” TASS quoted the Prosecutor General’s Office as saying.




This screenshot from a video shows armed men inside the Crocus City Hall concert hall in the Moscow region, Russia. CNN cannot verify whether these were the armed attackers or Russian authorities who entered.


This screenshot from a video shows armed men inside the Crocus City Hall concert hall in the Moscow region of Russia. CNN cannot verify whether these were armed attackers or access to Russian authorities. social networks


Video footage showed a state of panic as the attack occurred, as crowds of people gathered, screaming and hiding behind padded seats, while gunshots began to echo in the spacious hall. A video clip obtained by CNN showed that a group took shelter next to a large wall of windows outside the concert hall, which they had to break to escape the gunfire.




Images geolocated by CNN show an armed person starting at least one fire inside the site. The person is shown holding something in his hand, and as he walks off-screen, a bright flash of light from a large flame appears in the video.




A rapid intervention team was called to the area, and more than 70 ambulance crews and paramedics assisted the victims.




One hundred and forty-five people were taken to hospital, TASS reported. Sixty people are in "serious condition."




According to the Kremlin, Putin was informed of the attack and is being informed of the actions on the ground.




The official RIA Novosti news agency reported that the president on Saturday wished a speedy recovery to those injured in the attack. He also expressed his gratitude to the doctors,” Rhea added.




TASS reported that firefighters evacuated about 100 people from the building. According to the Ministry of Emergency Situations, rescue teams are still working to remove people from the roofs.




Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin described the attack as a "terrible tragedy."




“My deepest condolences to the loved ones of the victims. “I have given orders to provide all necessary assistance to all who suffered during the incident,” Sobyanin said in a statement.




Sobyanin said on Telegram that he would cancel all sporting, cultural and other public events in Moscow this weekend.




Shaman, singer of the band Picnic, said he would bear the costs of the victims' funerals and treatment of the injured.




“We are all a big family. In a family there is no such thing as the pain of others,” the singer, known for his nationalist views, said in a video clip he posted on the Russian social network VKontakte to his more than 600,000 followers.




“My people, any trouble or misfortune has always united our country. They have made Russia tougher and stronger. This time it will not be possible to scare us and break us either.”

ISIS claims responsibility for attack at Moscow-area concert venue that left at least 60 dead

ISIS claimed responsibility for an attack on a popular music complex near Moscow on Friday after attackers stormed the venue with weapons and incendiary devices, killing at least 60 people and wounding 145 others.



The terrorist organization claimed responsibility for the attack in a brief statement published by the ISIS-affiliated Amaq Agency on Telegram on Friday. No evidence was provided to support this claim.




Video footage from Crocus City Hall shows the huge complex, which includes the music hall and shopping mall, engulfed in flames and smoke billowing into the air. The government agency RIA Novosti reported that the gunmen "opened fire from automatic weapons" and "threw a grenade or incendiary bomb, causing a fire." The agency added that they "then fled in a white Renault car."






State media outlet Russia 24 reported that the roof of the venue had partially collapsed.




The fire was largely contained after more than six hours. “There are still some pockets of fire, but the fire has been mostly extinguished,” Moscow Governor Andrei Vorobyov said via Telegram.




Friday's attack, the deadliest terrorist attack on Moscow in decades, came less than a week after President Vladimir Putin won a fraudulent election in a landslide to secure another term in office, strengthening his grip on the country he has ruled since changing the government. Century.




With attention focused on the country's war with neighboring Ukraine, Putin announced a national security message before Russians headed to the polls.




The massacre occurred before a concert by the band Picnic, according to Russia 24 channel. The band's manager told state media that the artists were unharmed.




“Unidentified persons wearing camouflage clothing stormed Crocus City Hall and started shooting before the concert began,” TASS quoted the Prosecutor General’s Office as saying.




This screenshot from a video shows armed men inside the Crocus City Hall concert hall in the Moscow region, Russia. CNN cannot verify whether these were the armed attackers or Russian authorities who entered.


This screenshot from a video shows armed men inside the Crocus City Hall concert hall in the Moscow region of Russia. CNN cannot verify whether these were armed attackers or access to Russian authorities. social networks


Video footage showed a state of panic as the attack occurred, as crowds of people gathered, screaming and hiding behind padded seats, while gunshots began to echo in the spacious hall. A video clip obtained by CNN showed that a group took shelter next to a large wall of windows outside the concert hall, which they had to break to escape the gunfire.




Images geolocated by CNN show an armed person starting at least one fire inside the site. The person is shown holding something in his hand, and as he walks off-screen, a bright flash of light from a large flame appears in the video.




A rapid intervention team was called to the area, and more than 70 ambulance crews and paramedics assisted the victims.




One hundred and forty-five people were taken to hospital, TASS reported. Sixty people are in "serious condition."




According to the Kremlin, Putin was informed of the attack and is being informed of the actions on the ground.




The official RIA Novosti news agency reported that the president on Saturday wished a speedy recovery to those injured in the attack. He also expressed his gratitude to the doctors,” Rhea added.




TASS reported that firefighters evacuated about 100 people from the building. According to the Ministry of Emergency Situations, rescue teams are still working to remove people from the roofs.




Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin described the attack as a "terrible tragedy."




“My deepest condolences to the loved ones of the victims. “I have given orders to provide all necessary assistance to all who suffered during the incident,” Sobyanin said in a statement.




Sobyanin said on Telegram that he would cancel all sporting, cultural and other public events in Moscow this weekend.




Shaman, singer of the band Picnic, said he would bear the costs of the victims' funerals and treatment of the injured.




“We are all a big family. In a family there is no such thing as the pain of others,” the singer, known for his nationalist views, said in a video clip he posted on the Russian social network VKontakte to his more than 600,000 followers.




“My people, any trouble or misfortune has always united our country. They have made Russia tougher and stronger. This time it will not be possible to scare us and break us either.”

US had warned Russia ISIS was determined to attack

 The United States warned Moscow that ISIS fighters were intent on attacking Russia in the days before attackers stormed Crocus City Hall in...